The 12 most outrageously expensive geek products we could find

Written by Belle Beth Cooper on September 27, 2012

There’s no shortage of luxury items to fill up your mansion with, no matter how geeky your tastes are.

If you’re planning what to buy first when you start making millions in Silicon Valley, or you’re just curious about what other geek-millionaires use their cash for, check out the luxury goodies on this list.

The most expensive comic book

Boasting the first appearance of Superman, Action Comics #1 is currently valued at $3.4 million for a near-mint condition copy.

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The most expensive Batman comic

Following Action Comics #1 close behind at $3.3 million is Detective Comics #27, which features the first appearance of Batman.

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The most expensive model car

If spending megabucks on a luxury car that you can drive isn’t up your alley, perhaps a miniature version is the way to go. At a starting price of $5 million, the 1:8 scale Lamborghini Aventador LP 700-4 is the most expensive model car ever made. From gold-wrapped carbon fibers to gold and platinum wheels, this miniature version is worth more than ten times the full-size car it’s modelled on.

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The most expensive Dungeons & Dragons miniature

Although not literally ‘miniature,’ the Colossal Red Dragon is one of the D&D huge figures – and comes with a huge price tag. If you’re a fan of Dungeons & Dragons, you might be surprised to know that it’s been reportedly valued at $350.

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The most expensive college dorm room

At a cool $18,080, The New School in New York boasts the most expensive college dorms in the U.S. In fact, out of the top ten most expensive college dorms reported by Campus Grotto, eight of them were located in New York.

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The most expensive TV show pilot

Although it was widely rumored to have cost ~$50 million to film, the pilot episode of Boardwalk Empire actually set HBO back $18 million according to Variety. This made it the most expensive tv pilot to be filmed, taking over the title from the $10-14 million pilot of Lost.

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The most expensive video game to buy

After Nintendo bought the rights to the Bandai game Stadium Events and rebranded it as World Class Track Meet, the original copies of the game were collected and destroyed to avoid confusion. For the lucky consumers who had already purchased a copy, the originals are now worth thousands due to their rarity.

When a sealed copy of Stadium Events was sold on eBay for $41,300, it became the most expensive video game ever sold.

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The most expensive video game console

If the standard Nintendo Wii isn’t quite luxurious enough for you, you can always fork out a cool half-mill for the Nintendo Wii Supreme designed by Stuart Hughes. At $481,250, you’ll get one of only three Wii Supremes created, covered with a 2.5kg coating of 22k gold and 78 quarter-cut diamonds.

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The most expensive movie fight scene

The second part of the Matrix Trilogy, The Matrix: Reloaded, went all out on special effects. The 17 minute fight scene that includes hundreds of Hugo Weaving (aka Agent Smith) clones cost over $40 million to film.

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The most expensive movie to film

From it’s 1968 production budget of over $100 million, War and Peace is estimated to have a price tag of over $500 million after adjustments for inflation. After seven years of production, the film was released in four parts, with a total running time of over eight hours.

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The most expensive video game to produce

With an estimated budget of $150-200 million, Star Wars: The Old Republic is reportedly the most expensive video game ever produced.

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The most expensive James Bond movie to film

Costing approximately $230 million to produce, Quantum of Solace is the most expensive Bond film created so far. It was also heralded as the most violent Bond film to date at the time of release, and used the most locations, covering six different countries.

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What would you spend your Silicon Valley millions on?

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About the Author

Belle Beth Cooper

Belle has spent the past four years as a freelance writer and social media consultant. She has written for The Next Web, Desktop Magazine and Social Media Examiner. Belle now spends her days wielding a pencil as Attendly's Head of Content.

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